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  1. Parenting Toward the Kingdom: Orthodox Christian Principles of Child-Rearing

    Parenting Toward the Kingdom: Orthodox Christian Principles of Child-Rearing

    $26.95

    About the author: Dr. Philip Mamalakis, with his wife Georgia and seven children, lives in Boston, Massachusetts, where he is the Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology. Dr. Mamalakis directs the field education program and teaches classes on pastoral care,marriage and family, grief, death and dying, and topics related to pastoral counseling. He has a private practice in Newton, Massachusetts, where he works with individuals, couples, and families. Dr. Mamalakis has an M.Div. from Holy Cross and a Ph.D. from Purdue University in child development and family studies, specializing in marriage and family therapy. He has been offering parenting courses and writing on parenting for 21 years. He enjoys leading seminars and retreats on intimacy, relationships, marriage, parenting, and family life as well as Orthodoxy and psychology. Learn More
  2. Blueprints for the Little Church

    Blueprints for the Little Church

    $22.95

    Subtitle: Creating an Orthodox Home How do we as Orthodox parents keep our children in the Church throughout their lives? It all begins with involving them in the life of the Church from birth onward—in the parish and also at home. Blueprints for the Little Church provides practical ideas and encouragement—without judgment—for incorporating the primary practices of Orthodox spirituality into your family life at every stage of its growth and throughout the church year. About the Authors: Elissa Bjeletich hosts the popular Ancient Faith Radio podcast, Raising Saints: Educating Our Youth in the Orthodox Faith, Both at Home and in the Parish. She is the author of In God’s Hands: A Mother’s Journey through Her Infant’s Critical Illness (Ancient Faith Publishing, 2013) and the Sunday school director at Transfiguration Greek Orthodox Church. She lives near Austin, Texas, with her husband, Marko, and their five daughters. Caleb Shoemaker is the father of four children. A graduate of Gordon College with a BA in Youth Ministries and an MA in Biblical Languages from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Caleb has worked in church and parachurch ministry for seventeen years. He and his wife Emily converted to Orthodoxy in 2012. He blogs very sporadically about the importance of bringing the life of the church and the life of the family together at www.calebshoemaker.com. This is his first book. Learn More
  3. Orthodox Christian Parenting

    Orthodox Christian Parenting

    $34.95

    Out of stock

    C G's C Orthodox Christian Parenting is a must-have book for the modern Orthodox family struggling with the issue of how to transmit the beauty and values of our faith to childrenconstantly bombarded with worldly superficial distractions. This is a wonderful collection of articles, impressions, and suggestions from a wide variety of Orthodox sources. The casual reader need not fear being hammered by authoritative directives. The overall tone of this collection is very helpful and nonjudgmental. All phases of family life are covered in this volume, from marriage to sending an adult child out into the world and all the stages of child-rearing in between. I found myself captivated by the descriptions of young parents creatively engaging their young children in the traditions and rituals of of the church and thinking "I wish I had thought of that".One need not agree with every statement included in this volume to be ultimately enlightened and inspired by the rare love expressed here by people who truly believe that children have souls and that parents have spiritual responsibilities. Presbytera Juliana Cowni Learn More
  4. Primacy in the Church: The Office of Primate and the Authority of Councils (Volume 2)

    Primacy in the Church: The Office of Primate and the Authority of Councils (Volume 2)

    $54.95

    PRIMACY IN THE CHURCH is a careful and critical selection of historical and theological essays, canonical and liturgical articles, as well as contemporary and contextual reflections on what is arguably the most significant and sensitive issue in both inter-Orthodox debate and inter-Christian dialogue—namely, the authority of the primate and the role of councils in the thought and tradition of the Church. Volume One examines the development and application of a theology of primacy and synodality through the centuries. Volume Two explores how such a theology can inform contemporary ecclesiology and reconcile current practices. Chryssavgis draws together original contributions from prominent scholars today, complemented by formative selections from theologians in the recent past, as well as relevant ecumenical documents. EDITOR: JOHN CHRYSSAVGIS is the Archdeacon of the Ecumenical Throne and author of many books on Orthodox theology, spirituality, and ecology. Praise for Primacy in the Church— "This is an important two-volume work on the issue of primacy in the Church. The subject is significant, and has attracted attention resulting in the publication of numerous studies produced in many countries and in different languages. The relevant bibliography is enormous. The present work constitutes a selection of articles and short studies, and offers a very helpful picture of the various aspects, questions, and problems related to the central topic. The contributors to the two volumes are well-known theologians who have dealt with the issue extensively. The editor and contributor of four articles, Fr John Chryssavgis, is to be commended and congratulated because he managed—cooperating with St Vladimir’s Seminary Press—to place at the disposal of Church authorities and theologians a valuable resource on a crucial issue." ~His Eminence Geron Archbishop Demetrios, Primate of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America "The theology of the Church has in the last few decades become once again an area of real interest and creativity, as our attention has been drawn back to the role of the sacramental Body of Christ in our human liberation into divine communion. Yet when it comes to the details of inter-confessional dialogue, the temptation is still strong to revert to familiar and comfortable positions, with—among other things—an assumption that historic polarizations over primacy and collegiality are fixed and given quantities. These excellent essays insist on going deeper. They do not pretend to resolve the issues that still divide Christians, issues over the charism of the Petrine office or the limits of sacramental fellowship or the authority of the episcopate; instead, they represent a clear and searching exploration of fundamental matters starting from first principles. We need more reflection of this quality. This book will be a major resource for all who believe that the ecumenical encounter is still a powerfully energizing context for theological thought." ~Rowan Williams, Master of Magdalene College (Cambridge University) and former Archbishop of Canterbury "I have eagerly looked forward to such a publication on primacy and synodality in the Church, which is the central issue between the Eastern and Western Church. These two volumes include research from a broad range of leading theologians, predominantly Orthodox and Catholic, on the present state of such discussions. I have long been convinced that there can be reconciliation between East and West if the question of primacy is properly redefined and resolved, primarily on the Roman side: on the one hand, not solely as an authoritarian primacy of jurisdiction and, on the other hand, not simply as an ineffective primacy of honor, but primarily as an inspirational and mediatory pastoral primacy at the service of the whole contemporary ecumenical Church. In the recent past, John XXIII exemplified such a primacy; and today, the same could be expected of Pope Francis. His fraternal encounters with the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew are a promising step forward in addressing these vital issues." ~Hans Küng, Professor Emeritus of Ecumenical Theology at the University of Tübingen CONTENTS • Foreword , John [Zizioulas], Senior Metropolitan of Pergamon • Introduction: Reflecting on the Future, John Chryssavgis • The Principles of Accommodation and Forgetting in the Twenty-first Century, Adam A.J. DeVille • Primacy and Apostolic Legend: The Challenge to Christian Unity, George E. Demacopoulos • Does Primacy Belong to the Nature of the Church?, Cyril Hovorun • Reflections on Authority and Synodality: A Eucharistic, Relational, and Eschatological Perspective, Bishop Maxim [Vasiljević] • The Canonical Tradition: Universal Primacy in the Orthodox Church, Alexander Rentel • The Ministry of the Bishop of Rome: From Doctrine to Modes of Exercise Bishop Dimitrios [Salachas] of Gratianopolis • The Ravenna Document and Canon 34 of the Apostles: The Position of the Patriarchate of Moscow on Primacy Bishop Kyrillos [Katerelos] of Abydos • Vatican I: Papal Primacy within a Juridical Model of Church Bernard P. Prusak • Collegiality and Primacy in John Henry Newman, Mark Reasoner • Sentinel of Unity: Jean-Marie Tillard on Primacy and Collegiality Brian P. Flanagan • Primacy and Synodality: An Essay Review of Official Statements, with Special Focus on the Ravenna Document, Nikolaos Asproulis • The Synodal Institution: Reduction and Compromise, Stylianos [Harkianakis], Archbishop of Australia • The Place of the Papacy in a Historically Conscious Ecclesiology Neil Ormerod • Sister Churches and Problematic Structures, Robert F. Taft, SJ • A Tale of Two Speeches: Secularism and Primacy in Contemporary Roman Catholicism and Russian Orthodoxy Brandon Gallaher • Recent Trends and Tensions: Intra-Orthodox and Intra-Catholic Thinking on Primacy and Synodality, Will Cohen • The Orthodox Church and the Primacy of Peter: Are We Any Closer to a Solution? Metropolitan Kallistos [Ware] of Diokleia • Reflections on the Catholic-Orthodox Dialogue Concerning Primacy, Walter Cardinal Kasper • Afterword - Contemporary Ecclesiology and Kenotic Leadership: The Orthodox Church and the Great Council, John Behr and John Chryssavgis • Index of Names and Subjects Learn More
  5. The Ways of Childhood

    The Ways of Childhood

    $24.95

    Out of stock

    George Khodr is more than a writer and more than a scholar. Before all else, he is a pastor who used well his talents to introduce Christ into the human heart as well into the intellect. Born in a multicultural and multi-confessional orbit, he kept a well rooted faith without being hemmed in, either within strict conservatism or within an atmosphere of liberalism. Learn More
  6. Orthodox Church. An Introduction to Eastern Christianity. New Edition

    Orthodox Church. An Introduction to Eastern Christianity. New Edition

    $26.95

    Out of stock

    Since its first publication fifty years ago, Timothy Wary's book has become established throughout the English-speaking world as the standard introduction to Eastern Christianity. In this fully revised and updated third edition he explains the Orthodox views on such widely ranging matters as Free Will, Purgatory, the Papacy and the relation between the different Churches, making this the definitive guide for both Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike. Learn More
  7. Primacy in the Church. Volume 1. The Office of Primate and the Authority of Councils

    Primacy in the Church. Volume 1. The Office of Primate and the Authority of Councils

    $54.95

    EDITOR: JOHN CHRYSSAVGIS is the Archdeacon of the Ecumenical Throne and author of many books on Orthodox theology, spirituality, and ecology. Praise for Primacy in the Church— "This is an important two-volume work on the issue of primacy in the Church. The subject is significant, and has attracted attention resulting in the publication of numerous studies produced in many countries and in different languages. The relevant bibliography is enormous. The present work constitutes a selection of articles and short studies, and offers a very helpful picture of the various aspects, questions, and problems related to the central topic. The contributors to the two volumes are well-known theologians who have dealt with the issue extensively. The editor and contributor of four articles, Fr John Chryssavgis, is to be commended and congratulated because he managed—cooperating with St Vladimir’s Seminary Press—to place at the disposal of Church authorities and theologians a valuable resource on a crucial issue." ~His Eminence Geron Archbishop Demetrios, Primate of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America "The theology of the Church has in the last few decades become once again an area of real interest and creativity, as our attention has been drawn back to the role of the sacramental Body of Christ in our human liberation into divine communion. Yet when it comes to the details of inter-confessional dialogue, the temptation is still strong to revert to familiar and comfortable positions, with—among other things—an assumption that historic polarizations over primacy and collegiality are fixed and given quantities. These excellent essays insist on going deeper. They do not pretend to resolve the issues that still divide Christians, issues over the charism of the Petrine office or the limits of sacramental fellowship or the authority of the episcopate; instead, they represent a clear and searching exploration of fundamental matters starting from first principles. We need more reflection of this quality. This book will be a major resource for all who believe that the ecumenical encounter is still a powerfully energizing context for theological thought." ~Rowan Williams, Master of Magdalene College (Cambridge University) and former Archbishop of Canterbury "I have eagerly looked forward to such a publication on primacy and synodality in the Church, which is the central issue between the Eastern and Western Church. These two volumes include research from a broad range of leading theologians, predominantly Orthodox and Catholic, on the present state of such discussions. I have long been convinced that there can be reconciliation between East and West if the question of primacy is properly redefined and resolved, primarily on the Roman side: on the one hand, not solely as an authoritarian primacy of jurisdiction and, on the other hand, not simply as an ineffective primacy of honor, but primarily as an inspirational and mediatory pastoral primacy at the service of the whole contemporary ecumenical Church. In the recent past, John XXIII exemplified such a primacy; and today, the same could be expected of Pope Francis. His fraternal encounters with the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew are a promising step forward in addressing these vital issues." ~Hans Küng, Professor Emeritus of Ecumenical Theology at the University of Tübingen CONTENTS •Foreword, Metropolitan Kallistos [Ware] of Diokleia •Introduction, John Chryssavgis •The Meaning and Exercise of “Primacies of Honor” in the Early Church, Brian E. Daley,SJ •The Apostolic Tradition: Historical and Theological Principles, John Chryssavgis •St Irenaeus of Lyons and the Church of Rome, John Behr •Primacy, Collegiality, and the People of God, Metropolitan Kallistos [Ware] of Diokleia •Mark of Ephesus, the Council of Florence, and the Roman Papacy, Christiaan Kappes •The Ethical Reality of Councils: An Anglican Perspective, Paul Valliere •Primacy and the Holy Trinity: Ecclesiology and Theology in Dialogue, John Panteleimon Manoussakis •A Liturgical Theology of Primacy in Orthodoxy, Nicholas Denysenko •Primacy and Eucharist: Recent Catholic Perspectives, Paul McPartlan •Primacy in Orthodox Theology: Past and Present, Metropolitan Maximos [Vgenopoulos] of Selyvria •Primacy in the Thought of John [Zizioulas], Metropolitan of Pergamon, Aristotle Papanikolaou •Primacy in the Thought of Stylianos [Harkianakis],Archbishop of Australia, Philip Kariatlis •Primacy, Ecclesiology, and Nationalism, Metropolitan John [Zizioulas] of Pergamon •Primacy and Synodality: An Essay Review of Contemporary Theological Literature, Nikolaos Asproulis •The Petrine Office: An Orthodox Commentary, Paul Evdokimov •The Idea of Primacy in Orthodox Ecclesiology, Alexander Schmemann •The Primacy of the Ecumenical Patriarchate:Developments since the Nineteenth Century, Metropolitan Maximos [Christopoulos] of Sardis •The Ecumenical Patriarchate in the Twentieth Century, John Meyendorff •Ecclesial Communion, Conciliarity, and Authority:The Ravenna Document •Position of the Moscow Patriarchate on the Problem of Primacy in the Universal Church Learn More
  8. Food, Faith, and Fasting

    Food, Faith, and Fasting

    $19.95

    Subtitle: A Sacred Journey to Better Health Orthodox Christians fast approximately half the days of the year. But in our food-obsessed society, how do we determine our approach to eating in general? Nutritional expert Rita Madden expands on her popular podcast to help us eat in a way that is healthful for both our bodies and our souls—in times of fasting, feasting, and the ordinary days in between. About the Author: Rita Madden, MPH, RDN, is the nutrition director for Mediterranean Wellness, a company that focuses on sensible weight loss/management and chronic disease prevention/management. She completed her graduate work in public-health nutrition at Loma Linda University. She has a podcast on the subject of food, health, and the Eastern Orthodox Faith on Ancient Faith Radio. She is also a member of the Orthodox Speakers Bureau, through which she conducts workshops on this subject matter on a nationwide level. Rita is passionate about this subject matter and is devoted to helping people form a healthy relationship with food. Learn More
  9. 2016 Icon Calendar, Icons of American Saints

    2016 Icon Calendar, Icons of American Saints

    $24.95

    Our 2016 icon calendar features icons of American Saints from many different contemporary American iconographers. 11" X 12" full-color calendar features large calendar boxes (1-3/8" X 1-3/4") for recording your important date reminders. Major saints and feast days traditionally celebrated in Orthodox countries around the world are listed. Note: this calendar uses dates according to the new calendar (the standard calendar used by secular government, also known as the "Gregorian" calendar). A Julian (or "old calendar") edition, is available. About the iconographers featured in this calendar Deacon Matthew Garrett—Deacon Matthew grew up in the Orthodox Faith, where he developed a great appreciation for icons. His father arranged for him to spend the summer of 1991 working for Philip Zimmerman at the St. John of Damascus Icon Studio. He grew enamored with the process of painting icons and spent the next several years reading about icons, looking for interesting prototypes to paint, working at the studio, and painting at home. Since graduating from St. Vincent College, he has continued to grow as an artist and to develop his own style. His work ranges from larger-than-life-size murals to postage stamp-size icons. For many years he was a member of St. Michael’s Antiochian Orthodox Church in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. In 2009, he married and moved to Boise, Idaho. He was ordained as a deacon in 2011 and serves at St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church in Boise, in addition to his continuing work as an iconographer. Deacon Matthew has exhibited his work and given lectures on iconography at festivals, churches, and conferences, and his work can be seen in many churches, especially in the northeast U.S. Contact Information: Email: matthew@holy-icons.com; Website: www.holy-icons.com; Phone: 208-859-9698; Studio Location: Boise, Idaho Dmitry Shkolnik—Dmitry was born in Moscow, Russia, in 1960. While studying in high school, he developed a keen interest in Russian religious art. Upon graduation, he pursued higher education in the field of architecture. Concurrently, he cultivated a knowledge of Russian craft art in the form of lacquer miniatures and icon restoration. In 1979-80, Dmitry began to work for the Russian Patriarchal Workshops (now known as SOFRINO). In 1981 he immigrated to the United States with his family. He enrolled in the Theological Seminary at Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, NY, in 1983. In his time there, he apprenticed under the well-known iconographer Archimandrite Ciprian (Pyzhov). In 1988 Dmitry completed seminary with a Bachelor in Theology. In his over 30 years in the United States, Dmitry has painted over 2,000 icons, over two dozen iconostases, and numerous church frescoes, murals, and wall ornamentations. You can see his work in churches and private collections all over the United States, Canada, Central and South America, France, Australia, Japan, Russia, Greece, and many other countries. Dmitry Shkolnik lives in San Carlos, California, with his wife and children. Contact Information: E-mail: shkolnikstudio@hotmail.com; Website: www.shkolnikstudio.com; Studio Location: San Carlos, California Janet Jaime—Janet is a communicant of St. Elijah Antiochian Orthodox Church in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and began writing icons in 1995, working in the traditional egg tempera technique. She is a full-time certified iconographer and also serves as co-chair on the DOWAMA Committee of Sacred Arts. She has been blessed with writing icons for homes and many churches, including St. Peter, Madison, MS; St. Andrew, Riverside, CA; St. Antony, Tulsa, OK; St. George, Cedar Rapids, IA; and St. George, Kearney, NE. Her St. Innocent and St. Jacob icons (see the months of April and August in this calendar) are part of a series of twelve icons installed at St. Elijah Antiochian Orthodox Church in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Janet has plans to print all the American saint icons in a series of cards soon; contact her via email for details. Contact Information: Email: eleousa@cox.net; Studio Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Fr. Theodore Jurewicz—Fr. Theodore was born Frank Jurewicz in 1949 into a Roman Catholic family in Erie, Pennsylvania. As a child he often visited the Old Believer parish of the Nativity of Christ in Erie. From these visits he developed a deep interest in the Orthodox Church, and, while still a teenager, converted to Orthodoxy. He attended Holy Trinity Seminary and in 1974 was ordained priest. Fr. Jurewicz studied iconography under the late Archimandrite Cyprian. He has painted about a dozen Eastern Orthodox churches across North America, one of his more famous works being his commission to paint the entire church at New Gracanica Monastery in Third Lake, Illinois. Completed over the span of three years, the church is painted in a Byzantine style and features richly colored designs and religious scenes covering the walls, vaults, pillars, and dome of the church. The frescoes are painted in acrylics on dry plaster. Fr. Theodore is an archpriest in the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, serving the parish of the Nativity of the Lord in Erie, Pennsylvania. Contact Information: Email: churchoffice@churchofthenativity.net; Studio Location: Erie, Pennsylvania. John Thomas Rigby—John Thomas has been intensely engaged in art since grade school and graduated with a BFA from the Herron School of Art in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1978. After his conversion to the Orthodox faith in 1988, he sought opportunities to engage in painting icons. With a wife and four girls to care for, he had limited access to training; however, he has had the honor of taking several seminars with Dr George Kordis, who both influenced his development as an artist and opened to him the complex world of egg tempera painting. These seminars provided a bridge between his original training in art and his growth as an iconographer. He currently lives in Indy with his wife and a revolving door of daughters. You may view some of his work on Facebook at “John Rigby Iconographer.” His St. Alexis icon (see the month of May in this calendar) is from Ss. Constantine and Elena Church in Indianapolis. Contact Information: Email: jr@santarossa.com; Studio Location: Indianapolis, Indiana. Jan Isham—Jan was a fine artist living in Goleta, California, during the 1970s and 1980s, where she worshipped with Saint Athanasius Church—one of the churches that was part of the Evangelical Orthodox Church movement, which eventually entered into canonical Orthodoxy in 1987. During the early 80s, after Father Alexander Schmemann of blessed memory made a brief visit to Saint Athanasius and taught the group there about the role of icons within the Orthodox Church, Jan was asked by her priests to paint some icons for the parish. Since that time, she has pursued her interest in iconography and has completed commissioned pieces for several churches and many private individuals. She currently lives in Indianapolis, Indiana. Contact Information: Email: jan.isham@gmail.com; Studio Location: Indianapolis, Indiana. Vladimir Krassovsky—Vladimir was born in Bangkok, Thailand, to Russian émigré parents and immigrated to the United States as a child in 1954. From a young age he became actively involved in the Orthodox Church of All Russian Saints in the city of Burlingame, California, and began apprenticing as an iconographer under the direction of Nicholas Zadorozhniy when a new church was being constructed in his community. From 1969 to 1981 he apprenticed with the iconographer Archimandrite Kiprian, first at Holy Virgin Cathedral in San Francisco, and later at Fr. Kiprian’s studios at Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, New York. In 1985 he received the blessing of his mentor to devote himself full-time to iconography. In addition to painting individual icons and murals, his work includes consulting in various areas of church design and construction and the design of iconostases and other interior church decor. His St. Raphael icon (see the month of September in this calendar) was commissioned by St. Paul the Apostle Church in Las Vegas, NV, by Bishop Nikolai Soraich when he was rector of the parish. The photo is made available by special arrangement through Teshin Iconographics (iconographics@teshin.com), which also produces many other icons by Mr. Krassovsky. Contact Information: Email: vova@aol.com; Phone: 650-359-0901; Studio Location: Pacifica, California. About the Calendar Dates The feast days shown on this calendar in bold, blue type are the twelve great feast days of the Orthodox Church. Other feast days of some of the most popularly venerated saints of the Orthodox Churches around the world are listed in black, regular type. Dates are listed according to the Gregorian or “new” calendar. (Note: A different version of this calendar is available which makes use of the Julian or “old” calendar dates.) The date for Pascha (commonly known as Easter in the West) falls on May 1 in 2016. (The date for Western Easter falls on March 27 in 2016; only occasionally does the celebration of the Resurrection of Christ occur on the same date in East and West.) Many days throughout the Orthodox church year are designated as fast days (on which we refrain from eating meat products, milk products, fish, wine, and oil). These fast days, marked in red type, include the four canonical fasting seasons (Great Lent, the Apostles’ fast, the Dormition fast, and the Advent fast), as well as almost every Wednesday and Friday. When a major feast falls during a fasting season, fish, wine & oil are allowed. In addition, there are also several fast-free weeks and other special fast days. Because fast day designations vary slightly from church to church, consult your local parish for further details. About the Saints Featured in Icons in This Calendar Saint Herman of Alaska: Saint Herman was born in Russia in about the year 1756 and entered the monastic life at the age of 16. He was part of a group of monks from Valaam Monastery who were sent in 1793 to missionize the natives within the Alaskan territories. Saint Herman lived an ascetic monastic life on Spruce Island but was always a champion for the physical and spiritual needs of the Aleut natives, who greatly loved him. After a long life, he reposed in his sleep in 1836/37. He is commemorated among the saints as a wonderworker. Saint Herman’s main feast day is celebrated on December 13, and his glorification is celebrated on August 9. Saint Juvenaly: Saint Juvenaly was born in Siberia in 1761 as John Feodorovich Hovorukhin. After his wife died in 1791, he entered a monastery in St. Petersburg and was tonsured as a monk with the name Juvenaly. Three years later he went to Alaska as a missionary. He taught the native inhabitants about Christ, baptizing many of them. In 1796, according to native oral tradition, St. Juvenaly arrived at the mouth of the Kuskokwim River near the village of Quinahgak, where he was killed by a hunting party. Hieromonk Juvenaly became the first Orthodox Christian in America to receive the crown of martyrdom. Saint Juvenaly’s feast day is celebrated on September 24. Saint Peter the Aleut: Little is known about Saint Peter except that he was an Aleut native from Kodiak who became an Orthodox Christian. According to the story of his martyrdom recorded by Fr. Sergius of St. Tikhon of Kaluga Monastery, he was arrested and put to death by Spanish Franciscans in California because he refused to convert to Roman Catholicism. He is also mentioned by name in the life of Saint Herman of Alaska. Saint Peter’s feast day is celebrated on September 24 (together with Saint Juvenaly) as well as on December 12. Saint Innocent of Alaska: Saint Innocent was born in Irkutsk, Siberia in 1797 as John Popov, though his surname was later changed to Veniaminov. In 1823 he accepted the call to missionize the Aleutian Islands, Sitka, and some of the remotest settlements in Alaska, translating the Gospel into numerous native dialects. In 1840, after the death of his wife, Father John was tonsured a monk with the name Innocent, and the same year he was consecrated Bishop of Kamchatka and the Kurile and Aleutian Islands. In 1867 he was appointed Metropolitan of Moscow, in which capacity he served until his repose in 1879. He is commemorated among the saints as Metropolitan of Moscow, Enlightener of the Aleuts, and Apostle to the Americas. Saint Innocent’s feast days are celebrated on March 31 (the day of his repose), October 5 (the Synaxis of the Moscow hierarchs), and October 6 (the day of his glorification). Saint Jacob Netsvetov: Saint Jacob was born in 1802 on Atka Island, Alaska. His father was Russian and his mother Aleut. He was ordained a deacon in 1826 and served at a church in Irkutsk, Siberia. In 1928 he was ordained to the priesthood. He longed to return to his native Alaska and was given the blessing to be a missionary priest there. Besides serving as priest in his hometown of Atka, he served an area stretching nearly 2000 miles. He consulted with Saint Innocent regarding translation of the Bible and other literature into the Unangan-Aleut language, and he spent years in other translation work. In 1844, St. Innocent appointed him to head up a mission to the native peoples of the Yukon. To do that work, he learned new languages and spent the next twenty years, until his health and eyesight failed, in the wilderness of Alaska. He died in 1864 in Sitka. Saint Jacob is commemorated among the saints as Enlightener of the Peoples of Alaska. His feast day is celebrated on July 26. Saint Alexis of Wilkes-Barre: Saint Alexis Toth was born into a Carpatho-Russian family in Austro-Hungary in 1854; his father was an Eastern-Rite Catholic priest. In 1878 Alexis was ordained as a priest, and in 1889 he was appointed to serve a Uniate parish in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Roman Catholic diocesan authority in Minnesota did not accept his credentials as a Byzantine Catholic, which put into process a series of events that eventually led to several Slavic Uniate churches and several hundred people being reunited with the Orthodox Church through the auspices of the Russian Diocese of the Orthodox Church. Saint Alexis reposed in 1909, and his relics now rest at St. Tikhon Monastery in South Canaan, Pennsylvania. Saint Alexis is commemorated among the saints as a Confessor and Defender of Orthodoxy in America. His feast day is celebrated on May 7. Saint Raphael (Hawaweeny) of Brooklyn: Saint Raphael was born in Syria in 1860. Having attended the School of Theology in Halki, Greece, he completed his graduate studies in theology in Russia and was for a time the head of the Antiochian representation church in Moscow. In 1895 he was invited to be the pastor of the Arab-Orthodox community at St. Nicholas Church in New York. With the blessing of the Russian hierarch who headed the Orthodox mission in America, Raphael began to travel extensively across the US, ministering to Greeks and Russians as well as Arabs. Fluent in Arabic, Russian, and Greek, he soon became fluent in English as well and encouraged its use in church services and educational programs. In 1904, Saint Raphael became the first Orthodox bishop to be consecrated on American soil. He continued his episcopal labors in America until his death in 1914, by which time the Syro-Arab Mission had thirty parishes with 25,000 faithful. Saint Raphael’s feast day is celebrated on February 27 by the Orthodox Church of America and on the first Saturday of November by the Antiochian Archdiocese of North America. Saint Tikhon the Patriarch of Moscow: Born in 1865 as Vasily Ivanovich Bellavin to a father who was a priest, Saint Tikhon studied at the Pskov Theological Seminary and the St. Petersburg Theological Academy. When he became a monk in 1891, he was given the name Tikhon. He was consecrated Bishop of Lublin in 1897, and in 1898 was made Bishop of the Aleutian Islands and Alsak. As head of the Russian Orthodox Church in America, he did much to promote the spread of Orthodoxy and to reorganize his vast diocese. In 1905 the American Mission was made an archdiocese, and St. Tikhon was elevated to the rank of archbishop. His two vicar bishops (Innocent in Alaska and Raphael in the lower states) are now both saints. In 1907 he returned to Russia. In 1917, after the Russian Revolution, he became Metropolitan of Moscow and later was chosen as Patriarch. His years as patriarch fell during very difficult times in Russia. He died in 1925 and was canonized as a saint in 1989. Saint Tikhon’s feast day is celebrated on April 7. Saint John (Kochurov) of Chicago: Saint John was born in the Ryazan region of Russia in 1871. After his graduation from the St. Petersburg Theological Academy and ordination to the priesthood, he was sent in 1895 as a missionary priest to North America. He helped to build up and establish St. Vladimir Cathedral in Chicago and the Church of the Three Hierarchs in Streator. He later became dean of the Eastern states and helped with many important diocesan matters. In 1907, after twelve years of service in America, he returned to Russia; at first he served as a theological teacher in the St. Petersburg area, then as a pastor at Tsarskoye Selo. On October 31, 1917, Fr. John was killed by Bolshevik revolutionaries. He is commemorated among the saints as the first clergy martyr of the Russian Revolution as well as a missionary in America. Saint John’s feast day is celebrated on October 31. Alexander (Hotovitsky) of New York: Saint Alexander was born in Kremenetz, Russia, in 1872. After graduation from the St. Petersburg Theological Academy in 1895, he was sent as a missionary to America. After his marriage and ordination to the priesthood in 1896, he pastored St. Nicholas Church in New York. Through his efforts, Orthodox communities were also established in Philadelphia, Yonkers, Passaic, and other towns across America, and he was instrumental in the conversion of many Uniates and Protestants to Orthodoxy. He left America in 1914, and served as a priest in Finland for three years before being transferred to Moscow in 1917. Due to his resistance to the secular Soviet regime, he was arrested for brief periods in 1920 and 1921. In 1924 he was sent into exile, was arrested again in the fall of 1937, and was later martyred. Saint Alexander is commemorated among the saints as a priest martyr. His feast day is celebrated on December 4. Saint Nikolai of Zhica and Ochrid: Saint Nikolai was born in western Serbia in 1881. He graduated from St. Sava Seminary in Belgrade in 1905 and went on to earn doctoral degrees from the University of Berne in 1908 and from King’s College, Oxford, in 1909. In 1909 he was tonsured as a monk, then ordained to the priesthood. After some further study in Russia, he returned to Belgrade, where he taught philosophy, logic, history, and foreign languages at the seminary. He was consecrated as bishop of Zhica in 1919 and later transferred to Ochrid. In 1921, Bishop Nicholas was invited to visit America and spent two years there as a missionary bishop. He returned to America in 1946. He taught at St. Sava Seminary in Libertyville, Illinois, before settling in 1951 at St. Tikhon’s Monastery in South Canaan, Pennsylvania, where he served as dean of the seminary. He died in 1956 and was first buried at St. Sava Monastery, though his relics were later transferred to a monastery in Serbia. He is well known for his writings, including the Prologue from Ochrid, Prayers by the Lake, and other spiritual writings. Saint Nikolai’s feast day is celebrated on March 5. Saint John of San Francisco: Saint John was born in 1896 in Russia as Michael Maximovich. His family fled Russia during the Bolshevik resolution, emigrating to Yugoslavia. After completing his theological education in Belgrade, in 1926 he was tonsured a monk and soon after ordained as a priest. In 1934 he was consecrated a bishop and assigned to the diocese of Shanghai. Twelve years later he was made Archbishop of China. When the communists came to power in China, Saint John led the exodus of over 5000 Orthodox from China to the Philippines; many of these refugees and orphans later relocated to America. In 1951, he was assigned to the Archdiocese of Western Europe, with its cathedral in Paris, then in 1962 to the Diocese of San Francisco. As a diocesan bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR), he was greatly beloved by the communities he served, from China to France to the United States. He reposed in 1966, and his relics rest at Holy Virgin Cathedral in San Francisco, which he helped to build. He is commemorated among the saints as Archbishop of Shanghai and San Francisco and as a Wonderworker. Saint John’s feast day is celebrated on July 2. Learn More
  10. Welcome to the Orthodox Church. An Introduction to Eastern Christianity

    Welcome to the Orthodox Church. An Introduction to Eastern Christianity

    $44.95

    "With exhilarating clarity, Frederica Mathewes-Green introduces the profound mystery at the heart of the Orthodox Christian faith, which is also our common inheritance: it is a way of life to be encountered and performed; it is not reducible to a range of propositions to be considered. With great charm and with characteristic wit and humor, she prepares the way for those who arrive at an Orthodox church for services, letting them know what to expect, what to watch for, how to lean in—letting them know how best to open their hearts to this worship that is both ancient and ever new." —Scott Cairns "In her own warm and engaging way, Frederica takes you on a journey into a strange and exotic world for those unfamiliar with it but a spiritual refuge and oasis for those who have embraced it. This just may be the Church you have been looking for and didn’t even know it existed." —John Maddex, CEO Ancient Faith Ministries "Beautifully written and carefully explained with a heart for the non- Orthodox. As an evangelical, who grew up in the Greek Orthodox Church, until being shipped off to boarding school in England, I found myself longing to revisit the liturgy and traditions of my youth!" —Emmanuel Kampouris, Former Chairman & CEO of American Standard Companies, Founder of www.biblemesh.com "This excellent book is most valuable because it is more like a friend than a book. It's the voice you hope to hear beside you in church, murmuring explanations and encouragement as you make your journey. I highly recommend it." — Rev. Dr. Christopher Metropulos, Executive Director, Orthodox Christian Network, MyOCN.net Learn More

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